Paint Pigment

Formulas For Painters

by Robert Massey

Ratios of dry pigment to oil

The table below specifies the amount of dry pigment you need for each unit of oil. The left- hand column names the pigment. The middle column lists in volume measurements the ratio of pigment to oil: for one volume of oil, use the following volume of pigment. The right- hand column lists in weight measurements the ratio of pigment to oil: for one weight of oil, use the following weight unit of pigment.

Dry Pigment Pigment Volume Pigment Weight
Alizarin Crimson2.30.66
Burnt Sienna2.21.66
Burnt Umber1.91.33
Cadmium orange3.53.0
Cadmium red3.03.0
Cadmium yellow3.53.0
Cerulean blue2.02.5
Chromium oxide green2.03.4
Cobalt blue1.01.66
Green earth1.21.0
Indian red4.03.66
Ivory black1.11.0
Mars yellow3.41.6
Naples yellow2.04.0
Phthalocyanine blue1.00.4
Phthalocyanine green0.90.64
Prussian blue2.81.14
Raw sienna2.01.77
Raw umber1.81.28
Titanium dioxide1.81.28
Ultramarine blue3.52.3
Venetian red2.21.78
Viridian1.81.11
White lead( flake white)5.07.5
Yellow ochre3.02.0
Zinc oxide5.45.0

Lime- Proof Pigments

WhiteLime putty
Barium sulphate
BlueCerulean
Cobalt
Ultramarine
BlackIvory black
Vine black
Charcoal black
VioletMars violet
Ultramarine red
YellowCadmiums
Ochres
Mars colors
Naples
RedCadmiums
Earth or Oxide(Venetian, Indian, English,etc.)
BrownUmbers
Siennas
GreenViridian
Chromium oxide
Green earth
Cobalt

Drying Characteristics of Pigments

To achieve rapid drying glaze layers, choose pigments rated below as fast, as well as rapid drying oils and resins. By carefully matching pigments and resins one can control to a large degree the drying rates of mediums, glazes, and paints.

FastMediumSlowVery slow
Umbers
Burnt sienna
Flake white
Aureolin
Prussian blue
Cobalts
Oxides
Raw sienna
Leads
Zincs
Viridian
Green earth
Alizarin
Ultramarine blue
Cerulean
Yellow ochre
Ivory black
Cadmiums
Vermilion.

Continue reading on Primer

Leave a Reply